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A Framework for Public Health in the United States

Abstract

As in other countries, public heath in the United States continues to evolve to ensure healthy families and communities as well as individuals. Great achievements in the control of infectious and chronic disease and injuries will need to be sustained while we face new challenges, including providing universal access to high quality healthcare as well as addressing the underlying behavioral risk factors and the social, physical and environmental determinants of health. Meeting these challenges will require strengthening the governmental and non-governmental public health systems and working closely with other sectors.

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Correspondence to Jonathan E. Fielding MD, MPH, MBA.

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Fielding, J.E., Teutsch, S. & Breslow, L. A Framework for Public Health in the United States. Public Health Rev 32, 174–189 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03391597

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Key words

  • Public Health
  • social and physical determinants
  • health United States